About

Critiquing the culture of excess – uplifting the common good

Biweekly posts getting it done in 1000 words or less

I work as a bilingual Protestant minister and writer in Austin, Texas. My book Just a Little Bit More: The Culture of Excess and the Fate of the Common Good is distributed by ACTA Publications (Chicago) and is available as a paperback wherever books are sold, through Amazon, or through the Blue Ocotillo Publishing website, and as an ebook on Amazon, iBooks, and Nook. Reach me on Twitter @blue_ocotillo.

I’m working on a second book, due out the beginning of 2018, a non-fiction narrative account in the field of restorative justice.

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During my adult years, I’ve been a reader. I had a lot of assigned reading while in seminary – most (but certainly not all) of which I completed. Upon finishing graduate school, I thoroughly enjoyed the freedom of reading what I wanted. This freedom lasted for some twenty years. While I do read fiction, I’m thoroughly over-balanced on the non-fiction side. Taylor Branch’s Parting the Waters, Dee Brown’s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, Paul Johnson’s Modern Times, Richard Rhodes’s The Making of the Atomic Bomb, and Daniel Yergin’s The Prize are but a few of the captivating books I delved into over those twenty years. Reading a book is akin to having a conversation with another human being: a deep, meaningful, and thought-out exchange that as the reader I am able to conduct on my time. (Yes, I’m that person who carries a book around most everywhere.)

In the summer of 2011, the twenty-year run of unassigned reading came to an end. A crazy idea which I had never entertained started to take hold: write a book. Not just any book, but a book that responded to the fallout associated with the economic swoon that started with the housing market crash of 2007-08. As the details emerged, here we were once again dealing with the aftereffects of the inordinate love of money and misplaced trust in an economic system still prone to collapses. The so-called experts had been telling us that we had entered a new era of stability. They were wrong. Hadn’t we seen this before in the run-up to the Great Depression?

I started reading – by my own coerced assignation – all I could that covered the topic of how the economy crashed once again: banking, history, economics, commentary. I talked with colleagues and friends about my idea. Most were enthusiastic and responded with further suggestions. The idea of what I wanted to write began to form . . . something along the lines of societal excess and over-consumption. As I researched, I kept looking for the book that I wanted to write – to see if someone else had already written it. In those first number of months of heavy reading, I didn’t find it. I started writing. My reading and research continued as I wrote. All the while, I still spied for the book I was now writing. I came across some that were close to it, covering similar territory. I never found it, however. I finished my writing, and am now ready for further conversation. I’m confident the conversation we can have as you read my book will not only be worthwhile, but thought-provoking and influential.

Just a Little Bit More: The Culture of Excess and the Fate of the Common Good, published in May 2014, has been well received by those similarly concerned that American society, increasingly stratified economically, is losing touch with an egalitarian-fused common good.

Paperback $14.95 at the Blue Ocotillo website. Ebook available on Amazon, Nook, and iBook.

 

 

 

 

4 responses to “About

  1. Norb and Geanie Firnhaber

    I value this effort, Tim, and you give these thoughts credibility. Much needed reflection.

  2. Rev, I knew you had it in you~! I can’t wait to read “Just A Little Bit More” so that I can ask for “Just A Little Bit More 2”.
    Helen and I, though not regular attendees (unless you count once a month as regular) nonetheless enjoy and find great worth in your speaking.
    I am sure your writing will be even more thought provoking.
    I hope the book doesn’t cost more than $1.99 .
    Richard Haas

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